March 29, 1971

Meredith Baxter was a happy woman who died a happy death.

At the age of 87, Meredith passed away while cleaning her yard up on a warm and pleasant day in 1934. Her home, an elegant Victorian, was paid in full, and the taxes were paid annually from a trust, as were her other bills.

Meredith’s death went unnoticed due to her lack of social engagements, her generally rectitude regarding others, and the high walls that surrounded her solitary property.

Not until 1957 was her death discovered, and that was purely by accident. A young boy, chasing after his baseball, stumbled upon the woman’s skull.

The town eventually sold her property to pay for back taxes, and the home was purchased by a couple from Boston.

The young husband and wife didn’t report any instances that were out of the ordinary until after they began to tear out the garden.

Later that night, they heard the plaster crack in the spare bedroom, and when they went to investigate, they discovered a small vine had pushed itself through a previously unseen crack.

The following morning, March 29, 1971, they tore out the rest of the garden before going to the spare bedroom to remove the remainder of the vine.

As they entered the room, they saw that the vine had grown and that it was continuing to grow as they watched it.

The tendrils chased the couple out of the room, and later, as they talked about what steps to take next, the plant hounded them from the house.

The vines have spread through the building, and over the years they have replanted the garden.

Cross no longer seeks taxes for the property.

#CrossMassachusetts #fear #scary #death #dreams #murder #writersofinstagram #nightmare #horror

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Published by

Nicholas Efstathiou

Husband, father, and writer.

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