March 9, 1868

Vengeance is often a bitter draught.

On March 9, 1868, former Confederate sergeant Antoine de Sainte Beauvoir arrived in Cross. His purpose, as he had told friends and family prior to his departure, was to avenge his three brothers and his father, as well as several uncles and a baker’s dozen worth of cousins.

All this could be done with the slaying of one man: Duncan Blood.

In the heat of battle, during the war between the States, the Sainte Beauvoir Militia (made up of relatives along both the paternal and maternal lines) attempted a raid upon nearby Federal forces.

The militia was foiled in this by Duncan Blood, who had first fought Indians before the United States was a country.

The few survivors, including Sergeant Antoine, were adamant that they had faced at least a company size force of Federals. In all actuality, they ran into Duncan Blood, and no one else.

He had shown the militia no mercy, killing the wounded as he cut a bloody swath through their ranks. In the end, Sergeant Antoine and three others lived because they had fled the battle.

Furious at having been put to flight by a single man, Sergeant Antoine vowed to find Duncan Blood and exact his revenge.

On March 9, he attempted to do just that.

He found Duncan Blood in the street, and he called Duncan out.

Duncan, who had left the general store carrying a new hatchet, killed Antoine where he stood. Then, much to the horror of all, Duncan scalped the man.

When asked why, Duncan replied, “What was good for his father was good enough for him.”

#CrossMassachusetts #fear #scary #death #secrets #murder #writersofinstagram #history #nightmare #horror #Lovecraft

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Nicholas Efstathiou

Husband, father, and writer.

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