December 31, 1924

     On December 31, 1924, the Lifesaving Corps of Cross, stationed at the Cross Lighthouse, was hard-pressed to keep up with the number of incidents it encountered from the first minute of the 31st until the last stroke of midnight on the clock in Duncan Blood’s parlor.

     No shipwrecks were reported, no messengers came through with terrible news of a devastating event.

     But every hour on the hour, the Lifesaving Corps was pulling people out of the bitterly cold Atlantic water.

     The majority of those rescued succumbed to exposure, and others died as they were pulled into the boats. A few, however, survived their trial by water, and the tales they told were harrowing.

     They all, each and everyone, had been sleeping in their homes before waking, drowning in the ocean. And this statement was confirmed by the fact that all were in their bedclothes.

     Another curious item was the date.

     Each person agreed that it was the 31st of December, the last night of the year.

     Yet none of them agreed upon the year.

     Some folk claimed they were from as long ago as 1747, while others stated they had been asleep at home after watching the news on December 31st, 2028.

     These wet and tired travelers were whisked away into the depths of the Cross Historical Society, as were the members of the Lifesaving Corps. Only the Corps left the building, and when they did, their faces were white with shock and disbelief.

     When asked about those they rescued on the 31st of December, the answer was always the same:

     Who?

 

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Published by

Nicholas Efstathiou

Husband, father, and writer.

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