December 30, 1862

The lands belonging to Duncan Blood are perhaps the most dangerous in all Cross.

Since 1628, and the chartering of the town by Ezekiel Blood, Duncan’s father, the property known as Blood Farm has always been a strange and violent place.

Few know how old Duncan is, or how many dark creatures live in the confines of his land. Locals know that Blood Farm is littered with corpses, and children are warned at a young age not to trespass on Duncan’s property.

But while the townsfolk know, and while Duncan goes to great efforts to maintain a fence and posted signs warning trespassers away, there are always those who will seek to gain entrance to places they should not.

Perhaps the worst year regarding trespassers occurred in 1862, shortly after Duncan traveled with the Federal army to do battle against the Confederate States. He was not there to keep the borders of his property safe, and so people from other towns came in to see if the stories of Blood Farm were true.

Many of them learned the stories were nothing but true.

By the end of 1862, the townspeople of Cross took it upon themselves to patrol the borders of Blood Farm. Strangers had been seen entering the town, but never leaving.

On December 30, 1862, a photographer – guarded by men and women armed with rifles and swords – discovered and documented the remains of 74 individuals. But these were only the victims they could find on the edges of the property. No one dared to go in any further.

Patrols were kept up until Duncan returned in 1865.

 

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Published by

Nicholas Efstathiou

Husband, father, and writer.

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