December 27, 1923

     Cross is a town of curious events and strange people.

     A charter for the town was awarded in 1628, and the town has thrived ever since. Yet during nearly 400 years in existence, not a day or hour seems to have passed without something odd occurring.

     These events occasionally lead to death or result in the maiming of an individual. At other times, a strangeness makes its way onto the streets, pauses, then vanishes as quickly as it appeared.

     In 1923, the town of Cross suffered a series of suspicious fires. While some livestock was lost, the townspeople considered themselves lucky since no human was slain.

     On October 22 of that same year, the cat of Miss Rose McCullum, aged 16, was burned to death when the McCullum barn was destroyed by the arsonist.

     At the time, the police suspected Mr. Edward R. Berkley, aged 47, of setting the fires. There was no evidence to support the case against the man, and as he was a citizen of some renown and merit within the town, he was not pursued.

     Ms. McCullum did pursue the case, and she went and spoke with Duncan Blood about the issue.

     On the night of November 30, the unknown arsonist set fire to the McCullum home, and the building was a complete loss, although the family escaped unscathed.

     Once more Ms. McCullum was seen in the presence of Duncan, then she and her family went to Rhode Island to stay with relatives.

     On the evening of December 27, 1923, Edward R. Berkley, while walking from his shed to his home, burst into flames, setting part of the house on fire and dying despite repeated efforts to save him.

     No members of his family or their pets were injured in his demise.

Help Support Cross, Massachusetts!

Hello! I hope you enjoyed this post. If you did, please consider putting a dollar in the pot. 🙂 Every little bit helps, and each dollar allows me to spend more time creating posts and stories for you to read. Thank you for your support!

$1.00

Advertisements

Published by

Nicholas Efstathiou

Husband, father, and writer.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.